Julianne Moore recreates famous works of art for Harper’s Bazaar by Peter Lindbergh, May 2008

November 21st, 2014|Categories: Art, Celebrity Editorials & Photo Shoots, Fashion Photographers|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

One of my favourite themes in editorials is when famous works of art are recreated as fashion. This shoot Julianne Moore did with Peter Lindbergh in 2008 is one of the best. In it she poses in couture fashions and recreates works by artists like the one pictured above where she manifests as one of Edgar Degas’ dancers in Armani Privé, as well as shots by artists ranging from 19th century portrait artist John Singer Sargent to provocateur Richard Prince. Julianne’s milk-pale dappled skin, gorgeous bone structure, and transformative talent lends itself perfectly to this awe-inspiring shoot. Below are the shots of Julianne alongside the work recreated for the shot.

Julianne in Calvin Klein/”Woman With a Fan” by Amedeo Modigliani, 1919


Julianne in Bottega Veneta/”The Cripple” by John Currin, 1997


Julianne in Louis Vuitton/”Man-Crazy Nurse” by Richard Prince, 2003


Julianne/”Madame X” by John Singer Sargent, 1884


Julianne in Lanvin/”Seated Woman With Bent Knee” by Egon Schiele, 1917


Julianne in Dior Couture/”Adele Bloch-Bauer I” by Gustav Klimt, 1907


Julianne in Armani Privé/”Three Dancers in an Exercise Hall” by Edgar Degas, 1880

Photographer Guy Bourdin

November 5th, 2014|Categories: Erotica, Fashion Models, Fashion Photographers|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Guy Bourdin was a French photographer who worked extensively in the 70s and 80s.  He was the first photographer to create a complex narrative, then snatch a moment—sensual, provocative, shocking, exotic, surrealistic, sometimes sinister—and simply associate it with a fashion item. The narratives were strange and mysterious, sometimes full of violence, sexuality, and surrealism. Bourdin was influenced by his mentor Man Ray, photographer Edward Weston, the surrealist painters Magritte and Balthus, and filmmaker Luis Buñuel. Although less well known to the public than Newton (also working forVogue), Bourdin might have been more influential on the younger generations of fashion photographers.

Because Bourdin’s models “often appeared dead or injured”, some critics have accused him of objectifying women. His photographs were described as “highly controlled” and “famous for a mysterious sense of danger and sex, of the fearsome but desirable, of the taboo and the surreal”

 

Photographer David Armstrong

October 27th, 2014|Categories: Celebrity Editorials & Photo Shoots, Fashion Photographers|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |

British photographer David Armstrong died of liver cancer this week at age 60, leaving behind a legendary catalog of work that has influenced many photographers and will go on influencing future generations with its timeless style.  His work was always still, a moment of emotion conveyed through soulful eyes, subtle gestures, a flutter of a feeling over a face that he picked up on and captured.  His photographs had a lightness to them, beautiful in their softness, but with a wistfulness that brought the viewer in.   Armstrong worked closely with one his closest friends Nan Goldin who he had known since age 14.  The two released a book together in 1994 called A Double Life, showing how their differing styles reflected their intertwined lives.  We chose some of our favorite editorials by him, all having the delicateness that was his signature.

Chloe Sevigny

Tilda Swinton

Michael Pitt

Kirsten Dunst

William Mortensen, Master of Early Era Horror Photography

October 21st, 2014|Categories: Classic Celebrities, Erotica|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , |

William Mortensen is an art historical hero not well known to the masses. Mortensen began as a Hollywood artist; a contemporary of Cecil B. DeMille who worked in everything from set decoration to costumery. He was a photographer too, and as the jack-of-all-trades grew more popular in the film industry, he was able to photograph the likes of Jean Harlow and Peter Lorre, the resulting images ending up in glamorous magazines and bestselling books. Except Mortensen was no typical portrait artist.

Influenced by the burgeoning genre of horror film growing inside studios like Universal in the 1920s and ’30s, he produced portraits that were more nightmare than reality. Manipulating his images with printmaking techniques and rather primitive collage-like practices, his artworks looked like paintings rather than photographs. Given the subject matter — monster primates, transfixing nudes and anything occult — it was just easier to assume the former. His non-celebrity imagery had no limits, as he obsessed over torture, death and unbridled sexuality. (text from here)

Julianne Moore recreates famous works of art for Harper’s Bazaar by Peter Lindbergh, May 2008

August 7th, 2013|Categories: Art, Celebrity Editorials & Photo Shoots, Fashion Photographers|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

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