Homage to John Kacere by Robbie Fimmano for Interview, March 2015

March 19th, 2015|Categories: Art, Erotica, Fashion Editorials|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

This lush editorial from March’s Interview magazine is an homage to artist John Kacare. Kacere was one of the pioneers of the photo realism, painting ladies’ torsos clad in lingerie.   His subjects were usually lounging in bed, giving the paintings a sense of intimacy, with an emphasis on the fullness of curves.

John Kacere’s work

Tilda Swinton by Tim Walker for W, December 2014

November 25th, 2014|Categories: Art, Celebrity Editorials & Photo Shoots, Fashion Photographers|Tags: , , , , |

From W Magazine:

Tilda Swinton mingles with the Max Ernsts 
at the Houston home and museum of legendary patrons Dominique and John de Menil.

In 1984, Dominique de Menil staged an enormous exhibition at the Grand Palais in Paris, offering art lovers, for the first time, an in-depth look at the vast collection she and her husband, John, had assembled. The more than 600 works on view ranged from a paleolithic bone carving dating from 22,000–15,000 BC to 20th-century masterpieces by Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol, and Georges Braque. But when it came time to choose an image to represent the show on the posters that would be plastered around the city, Dominique passed over the blue-chip names and dramatically ancient artifacts in favor of a piece by the virtually unknown 19th-century artist Joseph Sacco. Called Oeil de Jeune Femme, it’s a tiny painting of an eye, framed by a brass oval and dark crimson velvet, and placed in a rough leather box. A surreal object made decades before Surrealism, it elegantly summed up, for de Menil, the idea of perception—on the part of the artist, the collector, and the audience.

It is fitting, then, that precisely 30 years after the Grand Palais show, the miniature work is sitting in the gloved hand of the actress Tilda Swinton, a woman who has made a career out of playing with perception: transcending time and gender in Sally Potter’s 1992 film Orlando, passing as an octogenarian dowager in Wes Anderson’s 2014 The Grand Budapest Hotel, and becoming a buck-toothed villain in last year’s sci-fi thriller Snowpiercer. Today, Swinton has come to the Menil Collection, the museum Dominique de Menil founded in Houston, to create a portfolio for W with the photographer Tim Walker.

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Julianne Moore recreates famous works of art for Harper’s Bazaar by Peter Lindbergh, May 2008

November 21st, 2014|Categories: Art, Celebrity Editorials & Photo Shoots, Fashion Photographers|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

One of my favourite themes in editorials is when famous works of art are recreated as fashion. This shoot Julianne Moore did with Peter Lindbergh in 2008 is one of the best. In it she poses in couture fashions and recreates works by artists like the one pictured above where she manifests as one of Edgar Degas’ dancers in Armani Privé, as well as shots by artists ranging from 19th century portrait artist John Singer Sargent to provocateur Richard Prince. Julianne’s milk-pale dappled skin, gorgeous bone structure, and transformative talent lends itself perfectly to this awe-inspiring shoot. Below are the shots of Julianne alongside the work recreated for the shot.

Julianne in Calvin Klein/”Woman With a Fan” by Amedeo Modigliani, 1919


Julianne in Bottega Veneta/”The Cripple” by John Currin, 1997


Julianne in Louis Vuitton/”Man-Crazy Nurse” by Richard Prince, 2003


Julianne/”Madame X” by John Singer Sargent, 1884


Julianne in Lanvin/”Seated Woman With Bent Knee” by Egon Schiele, 1917


Julianne in Dior Couture/”Adele Bloch-Bauer I” by Gustav Klimt, 1907


Julianne in Armani Privé/”Three Dancers in an Exercise Hall” by Edgar Degas, 1880

Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire

October 23rd, 2014|Categories: Art, Fashion|Tags: , , , , , , |

“Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire,” the fall Costume Institute exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, which opens to the public on Tuesday, is a powerful reminder of how, during much of the 19th century, the mourner’s wardrobe was distinctly defined, and how it evolved at various stages of grief. The show is arranged chronologically from 1815 through 1915, with about 30 looks, two of which are men’s-specific and one is for a little girl. The theme may come off as a little morbid, but far from sad. Instead, it’s a study of a past ritual that was mainly expressed via fabrics, i.e., matte right after the death of a beloved, with a gradual introduction of color, pattern and even shine as the mourner works through the grief. (text from here)

 

Artist Charles Addams

October 21st, 2014|Categories: Art|Tags: , , , , , |

Charles Addams created hilarious, spooky cartoons that are such macabre fun, and this time of year is the perfect season to enjoy them! Below is a selection of illustrations featuring The Addams Family, from his book Drawn and Quartered.