“Death Becomes Her: A Century of Mourning Attire,” the fall Costume Institute exhibition at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, which opens to the public on Tuesday, is a powerful reminder of how, during much of the 19th century, the mourner’s wardrobe was distinctly defined, and how it evolved at various stages of grief. The show is arranged chronologically from 1815 through 1915, with about 30 looks, two of which are men’s-specific and one is for a little girl. The theme may come off as a little morbid, but far from sad. Instead, it’s a study of a past ritual that was mainly expressed via fabrics, i.e., matte right after the death of a beloved, with a gradual introduction of color, pattern and even shine as the mourner works through the grief. (text from here)